Linton Army Camp and Manawatū Prison

The Linton Army Camp and the Manawatū Prision hold immense spiritual and cultural significance to Rangitāne O Manawatū. They were originally part of the Kairanga Reserve awarded to Rangitāne O Manawatū as part of the Te Ahu a Turanga Block.

Te Kairanga, which means a great accumulation of food, was occupied by Rangitāne O Manawatū hapu. The area and associated kainga were also the start of a commonly used path to traverse the Tararua and Ruahine Ranges following the Kahuterawa Stream.

The Kainga itself was located on the South East bank of the Manawatū River where Linton Army Camp and parts of the Prison are now situated opposite Awapuni. Upon the purchase of the Te Ahu a Turanga Block during the 1860s, Te Kairanga was reserved. The reserve was surveyed as Te Kairanga Native Reserve, approximately 850 acres on the southern side of the junction of Kahuterawa Stream with the Manawatū River.

Kairanga is also significant to Rangitāne O Manawatū as it was the site of a battle between Rangitāne O Manawatū and a neighbouring iwi. The iwi had attacked Te Motu a Poutoa and Rangitāne O Manawatū were intent on avenging the attack issued a challenge to the iwi to come openly and in all their strength and meet them at Te Kairanga (now part of Linton Army Camp). Upon accepting the challenge, Rangitāne O Manawatū gathered all their warriors from all parts of their extensive territory. Smoke signals were sent up from the summit of Arawaru summoning hapu from the Tamaki Nui A Rua area. A terrific battle then ensued between in which Rangitāne O Manawatū won a decisive victory.

The Kainga itself was located on the South East bank of the Manawatū River where Linton Army Camp and parts of the Prison are now situated opposite Awapuni. Upon the purchase of the Te Ahu a Turanga Block during the 1860‟s, Te Kairanga was reserved. The reserve was surveyed as Te Kairanga Native Reserve, approximately 850 acres on the southern side of the junction of Kahuterawa Stream with the Manawatū River.

Significant Rangitāne O Manawatū settlements in the vicinity of this area include Karatangiatu, Taringa Kurahaupo, Tukawakawa, Te Kuripaka, Turitea and Kahutara.

Cultural Landscape

The aptly named Te Kairanga provided Rangitāne O Manawatū with a plentiful supply of birds mainly kaka and kakapo as well as kiore, tuna and berries. The area was well known for its kiore and kiore traps of which the animal was made into a sausage like delicacy. The area was also covered in New Zealand rainforest of the heaviest type including white pine, matai, rimu and totara to name a few. The area became a saw miller’s paradise when the settlers arrived and in the longer term the settlers foresaw the area becoming rich agricultural farmland which it still is today.

Significant Sites

Name

Description

Kahutaira Kainga
Karatangiatu Kainga
Te Kairanga Kainga
Taringa Kurahaupo Occupied location
Tukawakawa Occupied location
Mararatapa Pa
Te Kairanga Pa

Name

Description

Te Kuripaka Pa
Kairanga Track
Kahutara Papa Kainga
Te Kairanga Papa Kainga
Te Horo Clearing
Te Kairanga Reserve

As Rangitāne O Manawatū develop their capacity they look forward to the future and the time when they are fully engaged in upholding the principle of kaitiaki over Linton Army Camp and Manawatū Prison.